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Measuring DEI and DEI Dashboard

Discover the power of data-driven insights with our comprehensive DEI dashboard, designed to measure and track progress towards diversity, equity, and inclusion within your organization.
DEI Dashboard

How to measure diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • Start with the DEI strategy framework here first.
  • Many metrics and indicators can be used to measure diversity, equity, and inclusion. It is essential to carefully select the metrics and indicators most relevant and meaningful for the organization and ensure they are measurable, verifiable, and aligned with your goals.
  • Collecting and analyzing data: Once the metrics and indicators have been selected, the next step is to collect and analyze data on them. This may involve using automated tools or processes or establishing protocols for manual data collection and analysis.
  • Learn More: ESG Data

 

DEI Framework Examples

DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) strategy framework is a set of guidelines or principles that organizations use to create and implement policies, programs, and practices that promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. DEI strategies are designed to ensure that all employees feel valued, respected, and included, regardless of their background or identity.

  1. Register and log in to the strategy app (click below)
  2. Go to the library to find the most appropriate strategy.

Click below for DEI Strategy examples.

  • Gender Lens
  • Racial Equity
  • Diversity Dimensions
  • Diversity Targets
  • Inclusion Benchmarking Data

Gender Lens Strategic Goals

  • Improving wealth through employment
  • Improving equitable education access
  • Improving workplace respect and cooperation
  • Increasing capital for women entrepreneurs
  • Increasing gender equality through financial inclusion
  • Increasing job security for precarious workers
  • Reducing gender inequities in governance
  • Reducing gender inequities in pay
  • Reducing gender inequities in workplace conditions
  • Reducing gender inequities through tailored products

Racial Equity Strategic Goals

Choose the single most important strategic goals:

  • Improving wealth through employment
  • Improving workplace respect and cooperation
  • Increasing access to essential medicines
  • Increasing access to medical diagnostics
  • Increasing consistent supply of essentials
  • Increasing job security for precarious workers
  • Increasing inclusive capital for communities of color
  • Shifting power through addressing racial bias
  • Reducing financial barriers to health services
  • Shifting the perception of risk through equitable deal sourcing

 

Diversity Dimensions

Diversity dimensions are the different ways in which people can differ from one another. These dimensions can include various characteristics, such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, ability, education, income, and geographic location. By understanding the diversity dimensions present within an organization or community, it is possible to identify and address any disparities or inequalities.

Some common diversity dimensions that are often considered include:

  • Age:  This dimension refers to an individual's chronological age and can range from young children to older adults.
  • Gender: This dimension refers to the social and cultural constructions of femininity and masculinity and includes categories such as male, female, and non-binary.
  • Race: This dimension refers to the social and cultural categories used to describe people based on physical characteristics such as skin color, eye shape, and facial features.
  • Ethnicity: This dimension refers to the cultural practices, traditions, and values associated with a particular group of people, often based on shared ancestry or national origin.
  • Religion: This dimension refers to beliefs and practices associated with a particular faith tradition.
  • Sexual orientation: This dimension refers to an individual's romantic and/or sexual attraction to others.
  • Ability: This dimension refers to the physical, mental, and emotional abilities of an individual and can include characteristics such as mobility, hearing, vision, and cognitive function.
  • Education: This dimension refers to the level of schooling and formal education that an individual has completed.
  • Income: This dimension refers to the amount of money an individual or household earns or has available to spend.
  • Geographic location: This dimension refers to the physical location of an individual or group and can include factors such as urban, suburban, or rural settings.

Diversity Targets

Diversity targets are specific goals or objectives that an organization sets about diversity, equity, and inclusion. These targets can be used to measure and track progress toward increasing diversity within an organization or community and to identify and address any disparities or inequalities.

There is a wide range of diversity targets that an organization can set, depending on its specific goals and priorities. Some common types of diversity targets include:

  • Representation targets: These targets aim to increase the representation of certain groups within an organization, such as women, people of color, or people with disabilities.
  • Inclusion targets: These targets aim to create a more inclusive culture within an organization and may include measures such as improving access to resources and opportunities for underrepresented groups or increasing the participation of these groups in decision-making processes.
  • Equity targets: These targets aim to address and correct any existing disparities or inequalities within an organization and may include measures such as equal pay for equal work or addressing barriers to advancement for underrepresented groups.
  • Culture and climate targets: These targets aim to create a more positive and welcoming culture and climate within an organization and may include improving communication and collaboration or increasing employee engagement and satisfaction.

Diversity targets are essential for organizations committed to increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion within their ranks. By setting and tracking specific targets, organizations can measure their progress and identify areas for improvement.

Inclusion Benchmarking Data

There are a few different ways that organizations can find inclusion benchmarking data:

  • Professional organizations and trade associations: Many professional organizations and trade associations collect and publish data on diversity, equity, and inclusion within their respective fields. This data can be a valuable resource for organizations looking to benchmark their inclusion efforts.
  • Industry reports: Industry reports and studies often include data on diversity, equity, and inclusion within a particular sector or industry. This data can be helpful for organizations looking to benchmark their inclusion efforts against their peers.
  • Government agencies: Government agencies, such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in the United States, often collect and publish data on diversity, equity, and inclusion within the workforce. This data can be helpful for organizations looking to benchmark their inclusion efforts against industry or sector-wide norms.
  • Online databases and resources: Some several online databases and resources collect and publish data on diversity, equity, and inclusion, such as the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list or the Human Rights Campaign's Corporate Equality Index.

Overall, there are a variety of sources that organizations can turn to to find inclusion benchmarking data. By comparing their own inclusion efforts against industry or sector-wide norms, organizations can identify areas for improvement and set more informed goals and targets.

Strategy to dashboard

DEI Software

A DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) dashboard is a tool that organizations use to track and measure their progress toward DEI goals. A DEI dashboard typically includes a set of key performance indicators (KPIs) that are selected to align with the organization's DEI strategy and goals. These KPIs are then used to monitor the organization's progress over time and identify areas for improvement.
  • DEI Assessment
  • DEI Framework
  • DEI Metrics
  • DEI Data Collection
  • DEI Survey
  • DEI Analytics
  • DEI Communication
  • Continuous Improvement

An organization should start with the DEI assessment process to understand top priorities. Based on the assessment, the next step would be the DEI strategy. Sopact has developed many out-of-box strategies that you can start with. Well-designed DEI assessment process should aim to provide the following key objectives.

  • Transparency: A DEI dashboard provides a clear and concise view of the organization's DEI performance, making it easy for stakeholders to understand and track progress.
  • Data-Driven: By providing quantifiable data on DEI performance, a DEI dashboard allows organizations to make informed decisions based on evidence rather than assumptions.
  • Accountability: A DEI dashboard holds organizations accountable for their DEI performance and progress, allowing them to identify improvement areas and track progress over time.
  • Benchmarking: A DEI dashboard can compare an organization's performance against industry benchmarks or best practices, providing a point of reference for progress.

ECG and CRSS Policy Screenshot

 

DEI Strategy Framework

Start from 20+ out-of-box strategies on gender lens mad racial equity based on your DEI assessment results. Pick the most important strategy and personalize for your internal assessment results.

 

Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Indicators

DEI metrics are specific measurements organizations use to track their progress on DEI initiatives. These metrics can include the representation of underrepresented groups in the workforce, the diversity of the leadership team, the incidence of bias and discrimination, and more.

DEI Metrics Examples

  • Demographic representation: This measures the proportion of individuals from different demographic groups (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, age, etc.) within a workforce.
  • Gender balance: This measures the workforce proportion of men and women.
  • Ethnic and racial diversity: This measures the proportion of individuals from different ethnic and racial groups within a workforce.
  • Disability representation: This measures the proportion of individuals with disabilities within a workforce.
  • LGBTQ+ representation: This measures the proportion of LGBTQ+ individuals within a workforce.
  • Geographic diversity measures the workforce's proportion of individuals from different geographic regions.
  • Educational background diversity measures the proportion of individuals with different educational backgrounds within a workforce.
  • Experiences: This measures the proportion of individuals with different experiences, skills, and backgrounds within a workforce.
  • Cognitive diversity measures the variety of perspectives, ways of thinking, and problem-solving approaches within a workforce.
  • Tenure diversity measures the proportion of individuals with different tenures (time served) in the company.

Depending on the context, other factors may also be considered in measuring diversity, and the metrics should be chosen carefully considering the goals of the organization and the context of the specific situation.

DEI Survey + Employee Demographics

Collecting DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) data has several ways. One way is through surveys or questionnaires, which can be distributed to employees and supply chain partners. These surveys can ask about demographics, experiences, and perceptions related to DEI. Another way to collect DEI data is through interviews or focus groups, which can provide more in-depth information.

Data can also be collected from HR systems, such as employee demographic, recruitment, promotion, and exit data. This data can be analyzed to identify patterns or trends related to DEI, such as the underrepresentation of certain groups in specific job roles or a lack of diversity in the recruitment pipeline. It's important to note that collecting DEI data should be done in a way that respects privacy and confidentiality. The data should be used to inform and drive DEI initiatives rather than for punitive or discriminatory purposes.

 

Collect continued data from employees and trading parters

Using Sopact Survey, you can collect data from various channels such as SMS, Email, WhatsApp, Offline, and Website.  In addition, you can send and track improvements using a scheduled survey.   There are several ways to collect ongoing data on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) from employees and trading partners:

  • Surveys: Surveys can be used to gather data on a wide range of DEI-related topics, such as employee perceptions of the company's culture, the treatment of diverse employees, and the effectiveness of DEI initiatives. Surveys can be administered online, by email, or in person and can be anonymous or not anonymous.
  • Employee focus groups: Focus groups can gather qualitative data on DEI-related topics by bringing together a small group of employees to discuss specific issues and share their experiences.
  • Interviews: Interviews can be used to gather more in-depth data on specific DEI-related topics. Interviews can be conducted with individual employees or with small groups of employees.
  • Trading partner engagement: Companies can engage trading partners in the data collection process by conducting surveys, focus groups, or interviews to gather their perspectives on DEI-related issues within the company.
  • Data tracking: Companies can track data related to DEI initiatives, such as the number of diverse employees in leadership positions, the number of diverse employees in the company, or the number of diverse employees hired in the last year.

When collecting ongoing DEI data, it's essential to be transparent about the data collection process and let employees and trading partners know how their responses will be used to improve the company's DEI initiatives. It's also essential to maintain the confidentiality and anonymity of the data, as well as to provide regular updates on progress and to involve employees and trading partners in the process of analyzing and interpreting the data.

 

 

Diversity and Inclusion Analytics

DEI Analytics can focus on various DEI learning goals.

There are several ways to track gender-based data in companies, including:

  • Demographic data collection: This involves collecting data on the gender of employees, such as through self-identification on job applications or employee surveys.
  • Pay equity analysis: This involves analyzing the pay of male and female employees to ensure that they are being paid equally for the same work.
  • Promotion and advancement tracking: This involves tracking male and female employees' promotion and advancement rates to ensure no gender-based disparities.
  • Employee engagement surveys involve surveying employees to gather data on their perceptions of the company's culture and the treatment of male and female employees.

When improving outcomes related to gender in companies, it is essential to consider the following:

  • Setting clear goals and targets: This involves setting specific and measurable goals for improving gender diversity and inclusion in the company.
  • Conducting regular audits and reviews: This involves regularly reviewing data on gender diversity and inclusion in the company and taking action to address any disparities.
  • Implementing diversity and inclusion training involves training employees on topics such as unconscious bias and the importance of diversity and inclusion in the workplace.
  • Encouraging employee engagement: This involves encouraging employees to share their experiences and ideas for improving gender diversity and inclusion in the company and taking their feedback into account when making decisions.
  • Holding leadership accountable: This involves holding leaders accountable for creating a culture of diversity and inclusion within the company and holding them responsible for achieving the company's goals related to gender diversity and inclusion.

 

Communicate Employees and Supply Partners

Engaging employees and trading partners in the process of collecting and analyzing gender-based data is essential for several reasons:

  • Employee engagement: By involving employees in the data collection and analysis process, they will feel more invested in the outcome and be more likely to support any changes or improvements.
  • Trading partner engagement: By engaging trading partners in the process, companies can ensure that they are aware of any issues related to gender diversity and inclusion and take steps to address them.
  • Improved data accuracy: By involving employees and trading partners in the data collection process, companies can ensure that the data is accurate and reflects the actual situation.

When collecting data, it is essential to use various methods, such as surveys, interviews, and focus groups, to gather a range of perspectives and ensure that the data is as accurate and comprehensive as possible.  Once data has been collected, it should be analyzed to identify any patterns or disparities related to gender. This data should then be communicated to employees and trading partners, explaining the findings and any improvement plans. When communicating results and improvement plans, it is essential to be transparent and honest about the data and any challenges the company may face related to gender diversity and inclusion. It's also important to clearly explain the steps that will be taken to address any issues and to involve employees and trading partners in the process. It is also essential to regularly review progress, update the plan accordingly, and involve employees and trading partners in the review process to ensure that they are aware of progress and can provide feedback on the plan.

 

 

 

It is a tool to help managers & employees.
  • Understand how the company is doing regarding DEI, where the issues are, and which areas need attention.
  • Identify the DEI-related goals, establish targets, and set up measurements for the progress.
  • Communicate the DEI strategy and plans to the different stakeholders.
  • Create accountability and foster a sense of ownership among employees.
  • Use data to develop and implement strategic initiatives that address the gaps and drive progress in DEI.

In addition, the DEI dashboard should be a living document that is updated regularly and accessible to the employees, the management, and stakeholders.

Case Study

Audible's innovative approach to Equity, Racial Justice, and Economic Empowerment

Audible, an Amazon subsidiary company uses an innovative approach to expand its community initiatives to advance equity, racial justice, and economic empowerment that benefits both employees and the community.

Explore the Case Study   

Audible Impact case study
FAQ

Measuring DEI

Measuring DEI can be done in many ways, but some standard methods include the following:

  • Employee engagement surveys
  • Employee resource group participation
  • Management and leadership diversity
  • Recruitment and hiring diversity
  • Pay and promotion equity analysis
  • Incidence of bias and discrimination reports
  • Customer and supplier diversity analysis

Diversity performance measures

Diversity performance measures are the metrics used to track and evaluate an organization's diversity and inclusion efforts. Some examples of diversity performance measures include the representation of underrepresented groups in the workforce, the diversity of the leadership team, and the incidence of bias and discrimination.

DEI measurement tools

DEI measurement tools are resources organizations use to collect and analyze data on DEI metrics. These tools can include surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Some examples of DEI measurement tools include the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Index, the Diversity and Inclusion Survey, and the Implicit Association Test.

Diversity metrics

Diversity metrics refer to the measurements used to track the diversity of an organization's workforce. Examples of diversity metrics include the representation of different racial and ethnic groups, genders, and LGBTQIA+ individuals, as well as individuals with disabilities.

 

Inclusion metrics

Inclusion metrics are measurements used to track the level of inclusion in an organization. Examples of inclusion metrics include employee engagement, employee resource group participation, and retention rates for underrepresented groups.

Inclusion metrics are metrics that organizations use to measure the diversity and inclusivity of their workforce. Some examples of inclusion metrics include:

  • Diversity: Proportion of underrepresented groups (such as women, people of color, people with disabilities, and LGBTQ+ individuals) in the workforce
  • Representation: Proportion of underrepresented groups in leadership roles and critical decision-making positions
  • Pay equity: Differences in pay between different groups of employees
  • Retention: Proportion of underrepresented groups who remain employed with the organization over time
  • Engagement: Survey results measuring how included and valued employees from underrepresented groups feel in the workplace

Some organizations use multiple inclusion metrics to get a more comprehensive view of their diversity and inclusivity. However, it is also essential to ensure that the metrics are aligned with the organization's strategy and goals and that they can be actionable.

Social equity metrics

Social equity metrics are a set of measurements used to track an organization's progress in promoting fairness and justice in the workplace. Examples of social equity metrics include pay equity, the representation of underrepresented groups in leadership positions, and the incidence of bias and discrimination.

Racial equity metrics are a subset of inclusion metrics that specifically measure the inclusion and fair treatment of people of color in an organization or community. Some examples of racial equity metrics include:

  • Demographic data: Proportion of people of color in the workforce, leadership roles, and key decision-making positions
  • Pay equity: Differences in pay between different racial groups of employees
  • Retention: Proportion of people of color who remain employed with the organization over time
  • Promotion: Proportion of people of color who are promoted to leadership positions
  • Disciplinary actions: Proportion of people of color who receive disciplinary actions (such as warnings, suspensions, or terminations) compared to other racial groups
  • Engagement: Survey results measuring how included and valued employees of color feel in the workplace
  • Community engagement: Proportion of community engagement and outreach initiatives that include and benefit communities of color

It's important to note that some metrics may only be available in some organizations or communities. In some cases, they may be more difficult to obtain or calculate. Additionally, not all organizations may have a big enough diverse population to apply these metrics. Nevertheless, it's important to strive for them. The goal should be to identify areas where racial disparities exist and use that data to drive targeted and effective action to address those disparities.

DEI metrics dashboard

The DEI metrics dashboard is a visual representation of an organization's progress on DEI initiatives using data collected using DEI measurement tools. DEI Dashboard Examples can be found in many organizations, where they monitor the progress and success of their DEI initiatives over time.

DEI dashboard examples

Diversity metrics examples:

  • Percentage of employees from underrepresented groups
  • Percentage of women in leadership positions
  • Percentage of employees from different racial and ethnic groups
  • Percentage of employees with disabilities

Diversity metrics examples

  • Percentage of employees from underrepresented groups
  • Percentage of women in leadership positions
  • Percentage of employees from different racial and ethnic groups
  • Percentage of employees with disabilities

Measuring diversity

It's important to measure diversity across the different dimensions of diversity and track it regularly. It helps organizations to understand where they are, identify opportunities for progress, and make sure their initiatives are effective.

Measuring racial equity

Measuring racial equity involves gathering data on the representation of different racial and ethnic groups in an organization and tracking the incidence of bias and discrimination based on race.

Organizational inclusion

Inclusion is about creating an environment where everyone feels valued and has the opportunity to contribute their unique perspectives and talents. It can be measured by tracking employee engagement, employee resource group participation, and retention rates for underrepresented groups.

DEI report

 DEI report talks about a company's efforts to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion. Diversity means having people from different backgrounds and experiences, equity means ensuring everyone has fair opportunities, and inclusion means ensuring everyone feels welcome.

Companies should develop a DEI report to show how they're doing on these issues and what they're doing to improve. For example, a DEI report can include information like the number of people from different backgrounds who work at the company, how the company is making sure everyone has equal opportunities, and how the company is making sure everyone feels included.

Companies should gather data on their current DEI efforts and initiatives to develop a DEI report. This can include employee demographics, diversity training programs, and employee engagement surveys. They can also gather data by conducting focus groups, interviews, and surveys with employees.
Next, companies should analyze the collected data and identify areas to improve. For example, suppose the data shows that the company has a low percentage of underrepresented minorities in leadership positions. In that case, the company should focus on developing initiatives to increase diversity in leadership.
The company should then develop goals, and action plans to address the identified areas for improvement, track progress, and report on it regularly.

Finally, companies should communicate their DEI report to employees, customers, and shareholders. This will help to demonstrate the company's commitment to DEI and allow stakeholders to hold the company accountable for progress.
It's important to note that DEI is not a one-time effort; it's an ongoing journey that requires companies to be persistent, transparent, and accountable in their approach.

DEI Report Template

A DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) report template is a document that organizations use to evaluate and communicate their progress in creating a diverse, equitable, and inclusive work environment. A DEI report typically includes the following information:

  • Demographic data: Information about the diversity of the organization's workforce, including race, ethnicity, gender, age, and other relevant characteristics.
  • Recruitment and retention statistics: Data on the diversity of the organization's job applicants and new hires and information on employee turnover rates.
  • Employee engagement and satisfaction survey results: Data on how employees feel about the organization's DEI efforts, including their level of engagement and satisfaction with the organization's culture and policies.
  • Training and development programs: Information on the types of DEI training and development programs offered to employees and the number of employees who have participated.
  • Progress and goals: A summary of the organization's progress towards its DEI goals and any new goals or initiatives that have been established.
  • Action plans: The organization plans to take specific steps to improve DEI, such as increasing the diversity of its workforce or implementing new policies and procedures to promote equity and inclusion.
  • Metrics: Quantifiable measurements the organization uses to track its progress in DEI.
  • Leader's message: A message from the organization's leader(s) regarding their commitment to DEI and the importance of this topic.

It's important to note that the content and format of a DEI report will vary depending on the organization, and some reports may include additional information or sections not listed here.

 

DEI Report Example

One example of a good DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) report is the annual DEI report published by Salesforce. It includes data on the company's workforce demographics, DEI initiatives, and goals. The report also provides detailed information on the company's progress toward meeting its DEI targets, such as the percentage of underrepresented minorities and women in leadership positions. Additionally, the report highlights the company's partnerships and programs that support DEI, such as its partnership with Girls Who Code and their Employee Resource Groups. Overall, the information is transparent and data-driven and provides a detailed view of the company's DEI efforts.

Example:  Salesforce: Workforce Diversity and Inclusion in 2022

DEI Software

Sopact Impact Cloud is a comprehensive DEI software that helps organizations understand their DEI priorities, develop clear strategies, and personalize their approach based on gender and racial equity goals. It uses surveys and data collection to gather information from HR and the supply chain and then uses a business intelligence platform to align learning objectives with the data.

Start DEI assessment here